CONNOISSEUR TRENDS, The Sapphire selection by Diana Key

 

 

CONNOISSEUR TRENDS,

The first in our new series will focus on Sapphire.

Sapphires have delighted connoisseurs for centuries with their spectrum of color and hues  ranging from velvety Kashmir Blue;  hues of “lotus blooms”  found in rare Padparadscha sapphires;   vibrant yellows  reminiscent of the sun and purples as rich as the lavender fields of Provence.

 

Fine Ceylon Sapphire set in platinum at Crane Jewelers

Fine Ceylon Sapphire set in a platinum ring at Crane Jewelers in Seattle, custom designed.

SAPPHIRE SELECTION:  ELEMENTS OF QUALITY

 

When evaluating sapphires, the most valuable colors, hues  and countries of origins are debated amongst gemologists and jewelers in different parts of the globe.  While the references of quality ascribed to diamonds:  color, clarity and cut, are broadly accepted across the world, there is no universally accepted grading system for colored gemstones.  Yet, few gemologists would dispute that pure, vivid colors are more desirable to muted, cloudy colors.  While market tastes will vary, the beauty of the gemstone must always rest deepest in the heart of its owner.

 

SHAPE AND CUTTING STYLES

 

The function of cut is to enhance the gem’s natural beauty to the greatest extent possible.  Sapphires provide a highly desired opportunity for collectors to select from a broader sample of cuts and shapes.  While shape is often one of the last considerations when selecting  quality rubies, quality sapphires samples are more abundant.  Although apiarists often elect to cut sapphires as ovals to allow maximum carat weight retention,  it is not uncommon to located sapphires exquisitely cut as rounds, cushions and pears in sizes over 3 carats.

 

 Hand made in platinum set with sapphire and diamonds ,Crane Jewelers Seattle

Hand made in platinum set with sapphire and diamonds ,Crane Jewelers, Ltd. Seattle

SAPPHIRES HAVE DELIGHTED CONNOISSEURS FOR CENTURIES WITH THEIR UNPARALLELED SPECTRUM OF COLORS AND HUES

 

Sapphire, also known as corundum, share the same mineral classification as rubies.  Sapphires  delight collectors with their broad spectrum of colors encompassing blue, pink, purple, yellow, orange and green.   From the opulence of velvety Kashmir Blue; to the rarity of  “lotus bloom”  Padparadscha sapphire, collectors and designers find inspiration through the natural and diverse beauty of sapphires’ understated elegance.

 

 

 

 

HOW TO EXAMINE COLOR

 

As with any color gemstone, the hue of color seen can be influenced by the light source used to illuminate it.  To ensure you select a gemstone that will look beautiful whenever you wear it, take time to examine the hue and saturation of the color against your skin and in different lighting.

 

•             Clean the stone with a cloth as fingerprints may conceal brilliance and color.

•             If possible, look at the gemstone face up against a variety of backgrounds.

•             Take time to examine the stone under direct light, as well as away from light.  Make certain the gem’s color saturation

is still pleasing to you out of direct light.

 

HOW TO EVALUATE CLARITY

 

Clarity is most traditionally understood as a reference to the inclusions within a gemstone.

 

•            Magnification will assist in evaluating the location, number and size of inclusions and if they may affect durability.

•             Clean the stone with a cloth as fingerprints may conceal some inclusions

•             If possible, look at the gemstone face up against under direct light, as well as away from light.

 

Unhealed cracks or occlusions, or a crack near the culet or a corner of a gemstone, will not only be unpleasing esthetically, they can reduce a gemstone’s resistance to damage.  Collectors should also remain aware of how these artifacts may reduce its value.

 

THE INHERENT DURABILITY OF SAPPHIRES

 

CONNOISSEUR TRENDS Sapphire Ring at Crane Jewelers in Seattle washington

A Sapphire Ring at Crane Jewelers, Ltd. in Seattle Washington

Sapphires are Grade 9 on the Moh’s scale of hardness, making them ideal for daily wear.  Only diamonds have a higher hardness grade, at 10.   The Moh’s (Mohs) scale of hardness is the most common method used to rank gemstones and minerals according to hardness.  Devised by German mineralogist Friedrich Moh in 1812, this scale grades minerals on a scale from 1 (very soft) to 10 (very hard).

 

RARE GEMSTONE SEARCHES

 

Kevin Glenn Crane is the owner and design director of Crane Jewelry Gallery.   An expert in period design, with over thirty years of experience in goldsmithing, platinumsmithing and stone setting,  Kevin Crane is available to assist with even the most exotic and rare gemstone searches.  Trained in Europe with masters from Germany, Spain and Eastern Europe,  Kevin Crane has  a loyal international following of clients and specializes in custom design and period restoration.  Crane’s work has been exhibited in North America, Japan, Italy and Germany, and is represented in collections internationally.  His work has been published in Marthe Le Van’s 500 Brooches (Lark Books).

 

 Crane Jewelers Seattle Washington

Crane Jewelers Seattle Washington

Crane Jewelry Gallery at 519 Pine Street in downtown Seattle, was designed by award winning architects Jim Olson and Tom Kundig in 1987.  Visiting the gallery is often reminisced upon as the experience of a private museum showing objects d’art from the farthest reaches of the world.

 

Location:              Visit Crane Jewelry Gallery of custom design and antique fine jewelry pieces.

Located at 519 Pine Street just across from Nordstrom in downtown Seattle.

Hours:                   Tuesday – Saturday        10 am – 5 pm

E-mail:                                  kc@cranejewelers.com

Telephone          206.624.1531 PST

 

CRANE JEWELERS-THE ART OF ELEGANCE

 

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For more information contact Kevin Glenn Crane,     Telephone  206.624.1531  Pacific Standard Time

Crane Jewelry Gallery, SEATTLE, WASHINGTON  USA

 

CRANE JEWELERS-THE ART OF ELEGANCE